Faculty Bio: Nicholas Dagen Bloom

Title:
Professor

Room #:
1613 HW

Phone:
(212) 396-6077

Personal:

Specialty
Areas:
Public and affordable housing, state and metroplitan planning, transportation policy and community planning history

Common Courses Taught

URBS 101: Urban Life
URBG 702: Structure of the Urban Region
URBP 700: Introduction to Urban Planning
URBP 701: History and Theory of Urban Planning
URBP 737: Planning Studio

Education

Ph.D. , American History, Brandeis University

Biography

Nicholas Dagen Bloom is Professor of Urban Policy and Planning at Hunter College. His research analyzes long-term planning outcomes in essential urban systems such as subsidized housing and mass transportation. He is the author of Suburban Alchemy (OSU, 2001), Merchant of Illusion (OSU, 2004), Public Housing That Worked (Penn, 2008), The Metropolitan Airport (Penn, 2015), and How States Shaped Postwar America (Chicago, 2019). He is co-editor of four edited collections including the prize-winning Public Housing Myths (Cornell, 2015) and Affordable Housing in New York (Princeton, 2015). Bloom serves as Co-Editor in Chief of The Journal of Planning History, the flagship publication of the Society for American City and Regional Planning History.

Professor Bloom has been quoted extensively on housing and other topics in media outlets including WNYC, The New York Times, CNN, and The Washington Post. As a frequent contributor to Gotham Gazette, he has written extensively on issues related to public housing; his editorials have also appeared in Newsday, The Daily News, and City Limits. As a co-curator of housing exhibitions at Hunter College and the Skyscraper Museum he has highlighted overlooked dimensions of community life. Bloom frequently joins panel discussions on issues of concern to planners, historians, architects, and the general public. He has taught urban affairs courses to thousands of students in previous positions at NYIT, NYU, and Tulane.
His current research project explores how the demise of America’s once excellent bus transit systems damaged the quality of life of all Americans and contributed to the rise of today’s highly segregated metropolis.